for more info and updates follow @josephineteaches on instagram

  • Josephine Brereton

3/28/2019

We continued to learn about varying ways to teach a song to students, particularly using methods that don’t require too much speaking. So far the use of repetition has really stood out to me as being important in the initial stages of learning the songs, especially repetition with focus on different elements (pitch, with words, rhythm/body percussion) which helps the students to memorise the song, and also internalise the pitch, words and rhythm as they work through the elements. While learning this way shows students how music is disciplined and repetitive, getting them to elaborate and improvise on the songs encourages creativity, which we continued to do through playing the room, and transferring what we had learned on to pitched and unpitched instruments.

0 views0 comments
  • Josephine Brereton

3/21/2019

Working with Orff specialist Belinda Smith this week affirmed what we learned about building a rapport with individual students, and how to do this in a group setting. We started by learning a simple song which allowed each student (going around the circle) to have a small ‘solo’ moment as they were required to sing their own name in response to the song. Furthermore, we learned the importance of letting students make their own music, not only by playing, but by composing and improvising. To facilitate this we learned to ‘play the room’, by using non-musical items like chairs, shoes, walls and boards as instruments which we used to create rhythmic ostinati.

0 views0 comments
  • Josephine Brereton

03/14/2019


The positive impacts of short term music tuition on the fine motor skills of children in this weeks reading demonstrates the significance of music education to children and its ability to improve skills in multiple areas of their life, indicating that a more extensive music education could continue and further develop these benefits for children.

I think that music education and tuition is also beneficial to students through its focus on the individual, as I’ve learned that it requires students to build a rapport with their students, and understand them as individuals in order to use the most appropriate teaching methods. This is further emphasised in Pam Burnard’s Teaching Music Creatively (2017), which also highlights the importance of ‘real world practice’, in the form of experiential learning, performance opportunity and formalised learning. Both these readings emphasised the importance of knowing and understanding individual students and their needs, and catering to them by using teaching methods that are appropriate and tailored to each student (otherwise called differentiation).



Burnard, P. (2017). Teaching music creatively. [Book chapter]. https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.13166



Martins, M., Neves, L., Rodrigues, P., Vasconcelos, O., & Castro, S. (2018). Orff-Based Music Training Enhances Children’s Manual Dexterity and Bimanual Coordination. Frontiers in Psychology, 9. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02616\

0 views0 comments